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A man looks over the Affordable Care Act signup page on the HealthCare.gov website in New York in this photo illustrationBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh a second major case targeting President Barack Obama's healthcare law on Wednesday when it considers a conservative challenge to tax subsidies critical to the measure's implementation. If a majority of the nine justices rules against the administration, up to 7.5 million people in at least 34 states would lose subsidies that help low- and moderate-income people afford private health insurance, unless Congress or the affected states act immediately. Such a ruling could also have a broader impact by deterring younger, healthier people from buying health insurance, which would lead to premiums rising for older, less healthy people who need healthcare most, said Rand Corporation economist Christine Eibner. The Democratic-backed law, narrowly passed by Congress over unified Republican opposition, aimed to help millions of Americans who lacked any health insurance afford coverage.

FILE - In this March 20, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. This was never happy-ever-after waiting to happen. When Obama and Netanyahu took office early in 2009, there were plenty of reasons to expect their relationship would be difficult. The cerebral president and the brash prime minister have stark differences in personality, politics and world views. Still, few could have predicted the downward spiral of finger-pointing, backbiting, lecturing and outright name-calling that has occurred. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was to address the US Congress on Tuesday in an increasingly heated battle with the White House over Tehran's nuclear ambitions, as negotiations resumed in Switzerland. Netanyahu has repeatedly attacked the emerging Iran deal and is reportedly planning to unveil details to US lawmakers to show why he believes it poses a grave danger to Israel. "Netanyahu made all sorts of claims," he told Reuters on Monday.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Jawad Zarif gesture as they arrive to resume nuclear negotiations in MontreuxWASHINGTON (AP) — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is seizing the bully pulpit of Congress to warn of the danger of trusting Iran curb its nuclear ambitions, even as President Barack Obama's negotiators continue talking with the Iranians Tuesday in hopes of closing a deal this month.

By Bill Cotterell TALLAHASSEE (Reuters) - Florida's legislature convenes on Tuesday with lawmakers expected to grapple during the 60-day annual session with measures including allowing concealed guns on college campuses and permitting doctors to prescribe medical marijuana. Discussion of casino gambling, a now-perennial clash between out-of-state gambling interests and entrenched family resort companies like Walt Disney Co, will also stir controversy in the next two months.    In addition, lawmakers will likely argue over how approximately $1 billion a year in real estate and land development taxes should be spent on conservation. The spending, mandated by a constitutional amendment approved by voters, could go to such projects as Everglades cleanup and beach restoration.

Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is shown in a courtroom sketch next to Judge George O'Toole on the first day of jury selection at the federal courthouse in BostonBy Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - The long-running process of choosing a jury to hear the trial of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is due to wrap up on Tuesday with the judge and lawyers for both sides selecting the panel of 12 jurors and six alternates. Tsarnaev could be sentenced to death if he is convicted, a fact that made jury selection in the federal trial challenging in Massachusetts, where state laws do not allow for capital punishment and the practice is unpopular.

Concerns over drug prompt delay of Georgia woman's executionJACKSON, Ga. (AP) — Citing concerns about the drug to be used in a lethal injection, corrections officials in Georgia postponed the execution of the state's only female death row inmate for the second time in a week.

The shipping docks of the deepwater harbor of the Port of Seattle is seen on this aerial view photograph taken from a helicopter in SeattleA coalition of environmental groups sued the Port of Seattle on Monday to stop the lease of a terminal to Royal Dutch Shell Plc's Arctic oil drilling fleet, arguing a proper environmental review was never conducted, court records showed. Earthjustice, along with other groups including the Sierra Club, filed the suit in a Washington state court, alleging the drilling operation was substantially different from the terminal's prior use, meaning an environmental review had to be done under state law. The complaint against the port and Foss Maritime Co, which would work for Shell under the two-year lease, also alleged that officials reached the arrangement without public disclosure and that the fleet could pollute the area's water. "We have received a shoreline substantial development permit exemption from the City of Seattle for this use," Port of Seattle spokesman Peter McGraw said in a statement, adding that officials had not yet reviewed the suit.

Students light candles at a tribute for victims, at one of nine crime scenes after a series of drive-by shootings that left 7 people dead, in Santa BarbaraThe families of three victims slain during a southern California rampage last year that left dead six college students and the killer are suing the county, the sheriff's department and the apartment building where the victims were killed. The parents of George Chen, Weihan Wang, and Cheng-Yuan Hong filed the federal suit on Monday, alleging that the defendants failed to recognize signs that the attacker, 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, was a danger and take action. Rodger fatally stabbed the three men, two of whom were his roommates assigned by management at the Capri Apartments at Isla Vista, in the dwelling last May before fatally shooting three more people, wounding 14 others near the campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara, and killing himself. The lawsuit pointed to several "red flags," including racist remarks Rodger made about previous roommates and other violent, erratic behavior, and alleged that the apartment managers did not investigate before assigning new roommates.

Yahoo News and Finance Anchor Bianna Golodryga talks to pro-democracy leader and human rights activist Garry Kasparov about the death of his close friend Boris Nemtsov.

Death row inmate Kelly Renee Gissendaner is seen in an undated picture from the Georgia Department of CorrectionsGeorgia halted the planned Monday execution of the only woman on death row in the state due to problems with the drugs to be used in the lethal injection, officials said. Kelly Renee Gissendaner, 46, condemned for the murder of her husband in 1997, would have been the first woman executed by the state in 70 years. "Within the hours leading up to the scheduled execution, the Execution Team performed the necessary checks. At that time, the drugs appeared cloudy," Georgia Department of Corrections spokeswoman Gwendolyn Hogan said in a statement.

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Des Moines, IA

Overcast, light freezing drizzle, mist
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