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This frame grab from video by Haberturk TV, shows smoke from a Russian warplane after crashing on a hill as seen from Hatay province, Turkey, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. Turkey shot down the Russian warplane Tuesday, claiming it had violated Turkish airspace and ignored repeated warnings. Russia denied that the plane crossed the Syrian border into Turkish skies. (Haberturk TV via AP) TURKEY OUTPresident Vladimir Putin on Wednesday ordered state-of-the art air defense missile systems to be deployed at a Russian air base in Syria following the downing of one of its warplanes by Turkey, a move that raised the threat of a military confrontation between the NATO member and Moscow.

In this Oct. 20, 2014 frame from dash-cam video provided by the Chicago Police Department, Laquan McDonald, right, walks down the street moments before being shot by officer Jason Van Dyke in Chicago. Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. (Chicago Police Department via AP)Mostly peaceful protests followed the release of the video of a black teen's slaying.

US President Barack Obama (R) and his French counterpart Francois Hollande hold a press conference at the White House in Washington, DC on November 24, 2015France and the United States pledged on Tuesday to step up the fight against the Islamic State group, urging Russia to throw its weight behind global efforts to resolve the four-year Syrian conflict. President Francois Hollande met his US counterpart Barack Obama at the White House as Turkey's downing of a Russian warplane dealt a severe blow to efforts to coordinate the fight against IS. Speaking 11 days after jihadists killed 130 people in the French capital, Hollande urged an "implacable" joint response to crush the group in Syria and Iraq.

Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, accused of fatally shooting a black teenager, arrives at the Leighton Criminal Courthouse in Chicago on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. Van Dyke was charged with first degree murder in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via AP)MANDATORY CREDIT, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES OUT, DAILY HERALD OUT, NORTHWEST HERALD OUT, DAILY CHRONICLE OUT, THE HERALD-NEWS OUT, THE TIMES OF NORTHWEST INDIANA OUT, TV OUT, MAGS OUT, NO SALESThe latest on the shooting of a black teenager by a white Chicago police officer (all times local): 12:45 a.m. A small crowd of protesters is snaking through streets near Chicago's downtown early Wednesday. ...

Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke is seen in an undated picture released by the Cook County State's Attorney's Office in Chicago, IllinoisA white Chicago policeman was charged with murdering a black teenager on Tuesday, hours before authorities released a graphic video showing the youth walking away from officers as he is shot 16 times. The footage of last year's shooting, taken from a camera mounted on the dashboard of a police car and made public under orders from a judge, prompted mostly peaceful street demonstrations in Chicago. The clip showed 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who authorities said was carrying a pocket knife and had the hallucinogenic drug PCP in his system, as he was gunned down in the middle of a street on Oct. 20, 2014.

Actor Ashton Kutcher arrives with Yehuda Berg for GQ magazine's "Gentleman's Ball" in New YorkA woman who brought a sexual misconduct suit against the former co-director of the Kabbalah Center, a spiritual group whose brand of Jewish mysticism has drawn many celebrity devotees, was awarded $177,500 in damages by a jury on Tuesday. The Los Angeles County Superior Court jury found Yehuda Berg, 43, known in Hollywood as "a rabbi to the stars," liable for inflicting emotional distress on a former follower, Jena Scaccetti, according to her lawyer, Alain Bonavida. The case marked the latest controversy faced over the years by the Kabbalah Center, a non-profit organization founded in 1965 by Berg's late father, Philip, a rabbi who espoused teachings rooted in metaphysical principles of Jewish belief.

U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet fighters are seen on the deck of the USS Ronald Reagan, a Nimitz-class nuclear-powered super carrier, in the Pacific OceanBy Andrea Shalal WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. government is working hard to ensure quicker processing of U.S. foreign arms sales, which surged 36 percent to $46.6 billion in fiscal 2015 and look set to remain strong in coming years, a top Pentagon official said. "Projections are still strong," Vice Admiral Joe Rixey, who heads the Pentagon's Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), told Reuters in an interview late on Monday. The fight against Islamic State militants and other armed conflicts around the globe were fueling demand for U.S. missile defense equipment, helicopters and munitions, Rixey said, a shift from 10 years ago when the focus was on fighter jets.

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Des Moines, IA

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Wed, 11/25/2015 - 05:54

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