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U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert placing his right hand on his face leaves a lecture hall for a hospital in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 5, 2015 after being attacked by a man. Lippert was in stable condition after the man screaming demands for a unified North and South Korea slashed him on the face and wrist with a knife, South Korean police and U.S. officials said. The board at right reads: "U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert's lecture." (AP Photo/Yonhap, Kim Ju-sung) KOREA OUTSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert was in stable condition after a man screaming demands for a unified North and South Korea slashed him on the face and wrist with a knife, South Korean police and U.S. officials said Thursday.

Dr. Stacy Addison arrives at Portland International Airport after being detained for six months in East TimorBy Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND, Ore. (Reuters) - An Oregon woman arrested on a drug charge while traveling in East Timor arrived home in Portland on Wednesday to a swarm of national and local media after six months of diplomatic negotiations. Stacey Addison, who said she was never in possession of drugs, was imprisoned for two months and then released without travel documents in December, leaving her unable to leave the Southeast Asian country. Really strange, but really good," said Addison, a 41-year-old veterinarian who was initially detained when a man with whom she shared a cab was arrested on drug charges last September. Prison conditions were basic, but she was treated well, Addison said at Portland International Airport.

Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton delivers dinner remarks at EMILY's List 30th Anniversary GalaHillary Clinton addresses controversy over her use of private email as secretary of state.

(Reuters) - At least two protesters were arrested outside police headquarters in Ferguson, Missouri on Wednesday, according to police and online video, just hours after the release of a U.S. probe that found racial bias in the department. The footage, shared by protesters, a local lawmaker and reporters on Twitter late on Wednesday, showed police take into custody at least two of the few dozen demonstrators. When contacted, Ferguson police were not able to provide exact arrest totals or specify the charges, but a dispatcher said protesters had been asked to move out of the street "many, many times." The arrests come just hours after U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder unveiled a report that found systemic racial bias created a "toxic environment" in the St. Louis suburb, but cleared white officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown there last August. Brown's killing touched off a national debate on race, led to months of street protests and amplified long-standing complaints in Ferguson and across the country of police harassment and mistreatment of minorities.

In this Nov. 25, 2014 file photo, police officers watch protesters as smoke fills the streets in Ferguson, Mo. after a grand jury's decision in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. A Justice Department investigation has found patterns of racial bias in the Ferguson police department and at the municipal jail and court. The full report, to be publicly released on March 4, says the investigation found Ferguson officers disproportionately used excessive force against blacks and too often charged them with petty offenses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department on Wednesday cleared a white former Ferguson, Missouri, police officer in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black 18-year-old, but also issued a scathing report calling for sweeping changes in city law enforcement practices it called discriminatory and unconstitutional.

Mark Lippert, a former US assistant secretary of defense for Asian affairs, took up his post in South Korea in October 2014SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean media say U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert has been attacked while giving a lecture and taken to a hospital for treatment.

Members of the King v. Burwell plaintiffs' legal team, including Kazman, Pruitt, Pamela and Douglas Hurst, and Carvin, exit the Supreme Court building after arguments in WashingtonBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court appeared sharply divided on ideological lines on Wednesday as it tackled a second major challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law, with Justice Anthony Kennedy emerging as a likely swing vote in a ruling. The nine justices heard 85 minutes of arguments in the case brought by conservative opponents of the law who contend its tax credits aimed at helping people afford medical insurance should not be available in most states. A ruling favoring the challengers could cripple the law dubbed Obamacare, the president's signature domestic policy achievement. Kennedy, a conservative who often casts the deciding vote in close cases, raised concerns to lawyers on both sides about the possible negative impact on states if the government loses the case, suggesting he could back the Obama administration.

Television reports say the US ambassador to South Korea, Mark Lippert, was injured in an attack by an armed assailant in Seoul, pictured on May 9, 2014The US ambassador to South Korea, Mark Lippert, was slashed on his face and arm by a blade-wielding assailant shouting anti-war slogans in an attack in Seoul Thursday, police and television reports said. The United States strongly condemned the "act of violence" which left the ambassador bleeding profusely as he was taken to hospital, and said that President Barack Obama had spoken with him. "The President called (Lippert) to tell him that he and his wife Robyn are in his thoughts and prayers, and to wish him the very best for a speedy recovery," said Bernadette Meehan, National Security Council spokeswoman.

St. Louis County Prosecutor's Office undated evidence photo shows Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren WilsonBy Lisa Lambert and Carey Gillam WASHINGTON/KANSAS CITY, Mo. (Reuters) - A U.S. probe found systemic racial bias targeted blacks and created a "toxic environment" in Ferguson, Missouri, but cleared a white officer in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager there, Attorney General Eric Holder said on Wednesday. The report said the St. Louis suburb overwhelmingly arrested and issued traffic citations to blacks to boost city coffers through fines, used police as a collection agency and created a culture of distrust that exploded in August when Ferguson Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot 18-year-old Michael Brown. Brown's killing touched off a national debate on race, led to months of street protests and amplified long-standing complaints in Ferguson and across the country of police harassment and mistreatment of minorities. "But seen in this context, amid a highly toxic environment, defined by mistrust and resentment, stoked by years of bad feelings, and spurred by illegal and misguided practices, it is not difficult to imagine how a single tragic incident set off the city of Ferguson like a powder keg." Holder, who is stepping down soon as attorney general, called for wholesale and immediate change in the way Ferguson operates.

It this courtroom sketch, U.S. Attorney William Weinreb, left, is depicted delivering opening statements in front of U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right rear, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev, depicted seated second from right between defense attorneys Judy Clarke, third from right, and Miriam Conrad, right, is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)BOSTON (AP) — The question, for all practical purposes, is no longer whether Dzhokhar Tsarnaev took part in the Boston Marathon bombing. It's whether he deserves to die for it.

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